Recognition of depression in people of different cultures

January 2019

General Practitioners

Country of origin: Sweden

Many minority group patients who attend primary health care are depressed. To identify a depressive state when GPs see patients from other cultures than their own can be difficult because of cultural and gender differences in expressions and problems of communication. The aim of a recent study was to explore and analyse how GPs think and deliberate when seeing and treating patients from foreign countries who display potential depressive features.

The data were collected in focus groups and through individual interviews with GPs in northern Sweden and analysed by qualitative content analysis.

In the analysis three themes, based on various categories, emerged; "Realizing the background", "Struggling for clarity" and "Optimizing management". Patients' early life events of importance were often unknown which blurred the accuracy. Reactions to trauma, cultural frictions and conflicts between the new and old gender norms made the diagnostic process difficult. The patient-doctor encounter comprised misconceptions, and social roles in the meetings were sometimes confused. GPs based their judgement mainly on clinical intuition and the established classification of depressive disorders was discussed. Tools for management and adequate action were diffuse.

The report concludes that dialogue about patients' illness narratives and social context are crucial. There is a need for tools for multicultural, general practice care in the depressive spectrum. It is also essential to be aware of GPs' own conceptions in order to avoid stereotypes and not to under- or overestimate the occurrence of depressive symptoms

Resources

Patient opinion database June 2019 Patient Opinion is a service that tells the public what people are saying about local health services and allows people to...
Hyperhidrosis Society website June 2019 The International Hyperhidrosis Society (IHHS) recently launched a website targeting teenagers who suffer from excessive...
What primary care needs to know about dementia May 2019 NHS England in cooperation with the Royal College of GPs and Hardwick CCG have published Dementia Revealed - What primary...
Renal Care gets personal May 2019 PatientView shows patients' latest test results plus information about their diagnosis and treatment. They can share this...
People in control of their own health and care May 2019 The idea that people should have a stronger voice in decisions about their health and care, and that services should better...
ERres evidence-based and up-to-date app April 2019 EM:RAP October 2014 edition by Michelle Lin: Top app for emergency medicine!!

Lifeinthefastlane.com: "This app is...
Sexual and Reproductive Health Profiles update April 2019 The Sexual and Reproductive Health Profiles tool has been updated. Among other developments, PDF report printouts are now...
SEND: guide for health professionals April 2019 This guide is for:

clinical commissioning groups
health professionals
local authorities

It...
The Nursing Roadmap for Quality April 2019 The Nursing Roadmap for Quality has been designed help nurses and their teams understand the elements of the quality...
CHEST Journal App March 2019 It just got a whole lot easier to keep up with the most recent and compelling information in the multidisciplinary...
Search by Keyword